Article

A survey to assess knowledge, attitude and practices among doctors about pharmacovigilance

Author : Sanjay Khanna, Dheeraj Kumar Singh, Pratap Shankar, Sachin Tutu, Preet Lakhani, Rakesh Kumar Dixit

The problem of ADRs is global. ADRs can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Adverse drug reactions lead to unnecessary economic burdens. To decrease the incidence and consequences associated with ADRs is a major challenge. The ADR reporting rate in India is below 1% compared to the worldwide rate of 6-10 %. .This is basically due to the absence of an effective ADR monitoring system and also due to a lack of proper knowledge, attitude and practices about ADRs and pharmacovigilance. To assess knowledge, attitude and practices among doctors about pharmacovigilance in a tertiary care hospital of Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh. This was a cross sectional, questionnaire based survey conducted in a tertiary care hospital of Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh. Out of 250 questionnaires circulated, only 210 were duly filled and were considered for the analysis of result. Out of 210 respondents 53.8 % of the doctors knew about the definition of pharmacovigilance (Pv) and 49.1 % knew the correct purpose of Pv. only 38.6% had knowledge about the Regulatory body is responsible for monitoring of ADRís in India. 84.8 % agreed to the point that Pv should be taught in details. 86.2 % agreed to the importance of establishment of Pv center in each hospital. The results of the study suggest that there is underreporting of ADRs and doctors are lacking requisite knowledge of pharmacovigilance. Training programmes are urgently needed to improve the doctors knowledge and attitude towards ADR reporting.


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