Article

An Oral Acute Toxicity Study of Extracts from Salvia Splendens (Scarlet Sage) As Per OECD Guidelines 423

Author : Sailesh Narayan, Abhilasha Mittal

Toxicology may be defined as the study of harmful, poisonous and adverse effects of drugs and other chemicals constituents found in plants, which may increase the chances of mortality or weakness in the general health, physically as well as mentally. The purpose of the study was to test the acute oral toxicity of the extracts of the plant. Acute toxicity of petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol fractionate of Salvia Splendens (Scarlet Sage) was evaluated in Swiss mice. The acute toxicity studies were carried out based on OECD guidelines 423 and fixed dosage studies was adopted where the limit dose is 2000 mg/kg body weight of test animal. The animals were orally administered a single dose of 5, 50, 300, 2000 mg/kg body weight. Signs of toxicity and mortality were noted after 1, 4 and 24h of administration of the extract for 14 days. The highest dose administered (2000 mg/kg body weight) did not produce mortality or changes in general behavior of the test animals. These results indicate the safety of the oral administration of petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and methanol fractionate of Salvia Splendens (Scarlet Sage)


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